Warping The Future

Exhibition is open and available on www.warpingthefuture.online.

Warping The Future explores the connection between the history of crafting and computing, by accentuating the tools that continuously weave this story and honoring the contribution of women in innovation. To bring some of the physical gallery experience to visitors, all objects featured can be seen on augmented reality.

Exhibition commissioned by the Gottesman Libraries at Columbia University with the support from the Eugene E. Myers Trust, in collaboration with Francesca Rodriguez Sawaya. Fullstack development by Matthew Ross, AR implementation by Mithru and 3D Models by Mint Woraya.

Main page of exhibition's first station, Humans As Machines. Photo of a backstrap loom in augmented reality.

Close up photo of the jacquard loom in augmented reality.

Close up photo of the jacquard loom in augmented reality.

Close up photo of the jacquard loom in augmented reality.

Playing around with small distortions on the base typography (Vinila), the logo is inspired by the verticality of the warp, which is the first set of material(s) that warps the structure of any weaving loom. In contrast, all other text applications use an extended version of the typography with the intent that the content is being weaved through the website and naturally having a more horizontal presence.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

The color palette uses several shades of natural dyes which are made and used by Andean weavers. The bright, lively colors were used to identify each of the exhibition’s stations and for call to action buttons, while more earthy, neutral tones were used on core elements and navigation pages.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

Main page of exhibition's first station, Humans As Machines.

The exhibition is divided in three stations:

Humans As Machines tells the history of weaving through different types of weaving looms;

Humans Automating Machines focus on highlighting the role of the jacquard loom in inspiring Ada Lovelace to write the first known computational algorithm and how that translated later to the first punch card computers. Visitors can design their own punchcard and visualize the generated pattern;

Lastly, Machines As Humans instigate visitors in learning more about the connection between weaving and computing through contemporary artwork. Visitors can also save any of the items and shared them later.

Backstrap Loom's page. Backstrap Loom's page scrolled.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

To help visitors digest all the exhibition’s content, a straight-forward interaction was needed to facilitate their navigation. Before starting the exhibition, visitors are exposed to instructions on how to interact with certain icons. When visitors only had one main button in a page (i.e. start exhibition), the component was standing out when compared to other elements in the page. In some screens we gave users a few possibilities of paths to follow (interact with an object, scroll through objects, see object in AR, learn more about object, scroll through stations), so all interactive components gain a more neutral aspect, in order to let visitors explore as they wish the exhibition without being mislead or overwhelmed.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

In order to promote the exhibition, we’ve launched the AR objects as filters on Instagram so people could feel instigated by them and share different placements of it.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth. Backstrap Loom's page scrolled.

Following the opening, we also hosted a series of conversations with artists featured in this exhibit. In conversation with was a moment to learn from the artists about their practice and their take on the relationship between craft and technology.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.

Photo of the upper part of the plinths. There is scaled a floor plan on a wooden surface on the top, a white text label on the front, and an iPad fixed on the side of the plinth.